Kejriwal New Delhi Muslims

Kerjiwal knew he had the full support of Muslims to defeat BJP in New Delhi

The poll verdict in Delhi has become a major event in the country’s politics — the AAP victory looks extraordinary in the face of a determined bid of the BJP to capture the national capital. On a closer look, however, it can be seen that a fairly even spread of support for the AAP, a substantive increase in the vote share of BJP and a precipitous decline of the Congress because of the transfer of its votes — particularly those of Muslims — to AAP, were the basic determinants of the results in the Assembly election.

The capital of a large democracy like India responds to national issues of economy and security differently from people in other parts of the country and does not get easily swayed by high decibel conflict-ridden campaigns — voters of Delhi showed equanimity about distinguishing between national level responsibilities and accountability for what was happening locally.

And in terms of visibility of the leader who would govern Delhi, the field was left totally devoid of any contest for Arvind Kejriwal. Delhi, it seems, might compel some course corrections in the strategy of major parties and induce a fresh incentive for consolidating coalition politics on both sides of the fence — the ruling camp as well as the opposition. 

A distinct demographic feature of an overpopulated Delhi is that more than half of its population comprises migrants who, broadly speaking, came under the umbrella of the ‘poor and the weak’ engaged in the issues of livelihood and looking for whatever benefits the local government could bestow on them. A distinct demographic feature of an overpopulated Delhi is that more than half of its population comprises migrants who, broadly speaking, came under the umbrella of the ‘poor and the weak’A distinct demographic feature of an overpopulated Delhi is that more than half of its population comprises migrants who, broadly speaking, came under the umbrella of the ‘poor and the weak’ engaged in the issues of livelihood and looking for whatever benefits the local government could bestow on them.

The rest include urban middle and upper classes, the community of ‘liberals’ and educated youth who would either be looking for answers to their economic aspirations or, if already in jobs, responding more easily to calls for national consolidation and unity. 

The voting pattern of Delhi did not leave room for surprises. AAP retained its connectivity with Delhi’s common man — the bulk of the ‘poor and the weak’ particularly their womenfolk, supported it notwithstanding the efforts of the Bhojpuri idol, Manoj Tiwari, while the Congress vote got largely transferred to AAP making it a direct contest between BJP and AAP. READ MORE.

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