President Gurib-Fakim praised for good governance in Mauritius

President Gurib-Fakim praised for good governance in Mauritius

December 2, 2017 0 By WFTV

The President of Mauritius, Ameenah Gurib-Fakim is praised for her role in ensuring that the tiny Island republic in the middle of the Indian Ocean remains on top of the ‘good governance’ report on Africa.

The report, an index of the top African nations with good governance by the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, lists Mauritius at the top for the fifth consecutive year.

This number one position is said to be linked partially to the codes of conduct established by the government in relation to the civil servants. The authorities (under the Labour Party at the start of the programme) has put in place mechanisms to ensure the codes re properly adhered to said the report.

However, face2faceafrica.com praised President Gurib for her role in the process.

It said: “Under the current President of Mauritius, Ameenah Gurib, cabinet ministers are required to uphold political impartiality of the civil service and ensure that there is no conflict of interest between public duties and private interests.

“Perhaps this is something that other African countries should emulate.”

Nevertheless, Mauritius is designated as the best-governed nation in Africa. The main aim of this index is to support and encourage good governance in Africa.

Out of 53 African countries, Mauritius, which has a population of about 1.2 million people, got the highest overall score of 81.4 percent followed by Seychelles with 73.4 percent and Botswana with 72.7 percent respectively.

At the bottom end of the table was Somalia with a score of only 11.6 percent behind Africa’s newest state South Sudan, which scored 20.2 percent.

Although Rwanda was not included in this year’s Ibrahim Index of African Governance(IIAG), it is reported to be the only African country that has maintained year-on-year improvement of its overall governance score. The foundation further notes that no country registers a year-on-year decline.