More hotels suggest tourism industry in Malaysia vibrant

More hotels suggest tourism industry in Malaysia vibrant

December 13, 2017 0 By User

More hotels being planned in Kuala Lumpur, along with a large number of budget hotels sprouting all over Kuala Lumpur, suggests that the tourism industry is alive and thriving, industry analysts and economists said to Malay Mail.

They also said the sustained recovery in tourist arrivals, which are expected to hit 28 million in 2018, necessitates the need to bolster tourism infrastructure such as hotels  

Recently, Marriott International and YTL Hotels said that they will develop two new luxury hotels in Malaysia and Japan in a collaboration to expand their strategic existing strategic partnership to 15 international properties across six brands. The new tie-up was announced during the signing of an agreement between the two companies at the Ritz-Carlton, Kuala Lumpur.

The two companies agreed to develop two luxury hotels in Malaysia under the JW Marriott and EDITION brands, and signed memoranda of understanding for two hotels in Japan, namely an EDITION and W Hotel in Niseko Village, Hokkaido.

Malaysian Institute of Economic Research senior fellow Shankaran Nambiar said:

“The large number of budget hotels sprouting all over Kuala Lumpur suggests that the tourism industry is alive and thriving,” he said.

He said the Malaysian economy is presently as supportive as it can be towards the tourism industry.

Nambiar added that the current level of the ringgit make it conducive for tourists to visit the country and the Goods and Services Tax is also not a matter of concern for tourists.  

He said that the tourist refund scheme incentivises tourist expenditure in Malaysia, and the excellent urban connectivity that was recently completed will also make traveling within the Klang Valley convenient and enjoyable.

He said although the cost of living may have gone up for Malaysians, that is hardly a matter of interest to tourists.

AmBank Research said that transport firms operating in the tourism space such as AirAsia and Malaysia Airports will benefit from the sustained recovery in tourist arrivals in 2018.

It said in a research note on Wednesday that the rapidly expanding e-Commerce sector, especially online shopping, has created huge opportunities for parcel delivery service providers such as Pos Malaysia.

Malaysia’s presence in the regional and global e-Commerce market is on the cusp of an unprecedented quantum leap forward, driven by the Alibaba-backed Digital Free Trade Zone (DFTZ) project in the KLIA Aeropolis.

The report also said that transport firms operating in the tourism space such as AirAsia and Malaysia Airports will benefit from the sustained recovery in tourist arrivals in

Socio-Economic Research Center executive director Lee Heng Guie said that in order to cash in on the wave of tourists that are expected to come in, all those involved in tourism-related infrastructures, such as the logistics and transportation sectors, should bolster their efficiencies.

In addition, he said promotional agencies and tour guides will also need to enhance their professionalism in order to make Malaysia an attractive destination.

“It is all about creating a tourist-friendly environment to attract and re-attract tourists, be capable to satisfy their expectations and perceptions,” Lee told Malay Mail in an email interview.

He also said that a sustainable tourism ecosystem where resources are mobilised in a creative way to deliver real time experiences to tourists and not just by showcasing the diversity of scenery, culture and food is needed.

“The airports, taxi and transport/coach operators, as well as hotels — being the first touchpoint of impression to tourists — must be enhanced in terms of good quality delivery services, ensuring a friendly environment for everyone, and avoiding the negative consequences of unsafe to move around, unfriendly hospitality, expensive lodging, and bad attitudes toward the tourists,” he said.

Lee added that both public and private promotional agencies must coordinate and manage their resources effectively to develop and formulate tourism strategic plans.

“There is no point having a big budget for tourism if the money is spent unproductively,” he said.